Bioethanol Production from Various Lignocellulosic Materials by Encapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCIM 3095

Sagar Bhakare *

Department of Biotechnology, Padmashri Vikhe Patil College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Pravaranagar, Maharashtra, India.

Mahesh S. Wagh

Department of Biotechnology, Padmashri Vikhe Patil College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Pravaranagar, Maharashtra, India.

Pravin Kale

Department of Biotechnology, Padmashri Vikhe Patil College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Pravaranagar, Maharashtra, India.

Avinash Gadhave

Department of Biotechnology, Padmashri Vikhe Patil College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Pravaranagar, Maharashtra, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Bioethanol has a greater promise for environmental safety and energy security than fossil fuels. The alternate source required to meet the fuel's requirements can be provided by bioethanol. Untapped sugar-rich sources, like cellulose-rich household wastes, industrial wastes, and agricultural wastes, can all be used to make bioethanol at a minimal cost. The study's objective was to determine whether saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from the encapsulated NCIM 3095 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae could be used to make low-cost ethanol from a variety of lignocellulosic wastes, including newspaper, banana leaves, gram straw, soybean straw, and cow dung. To reduce bacterial contamination and serve as an external growth stimulator, benzathine penicillin G and ammonium sulfate were added to each sample broth containing calcium alginate-encapsulated yeast cells. The samples were fermented for ten days. The ethanol content was evaluated every three days. The largest yield of bioethanol was produced by soybean straw (10.0%), while the lowest was by cow dung (4.0%).

Keywords: Cellulosic wastes, ethanol production, biofuel, bioethanol


How to Cite

Bhakare, S., Wagh, M. S., Kale, P., & Gadhave, A. (2022). Bioethanol Production from Various Lignocellulosic Materials by Encapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCIM 3095. Biotechnology Journal International, 26(3), 21–29. https://doi.org/10.9734/bji/2022/v26i3650

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